Tag Archives: trafficking

What did old articles say?

So just for the heck of it, I decided to look up older articles about the Mexican drug war to see if they were saying anything different back then to what people are saying now. But to my surprise, I discovered a lot of the same comments and opinions.

I looked up two different articles. One from 1997 and the other from 1999 and both located in the New York Times online. They are both opinion pieces and very short, but that’s what i wanted. Something that just shared what they thought over 10 years ago about the issue quick and straight to the point.

The first one from February 28, 1997 is a letter to the editor. This person touches upon drug certification and that the government uses that as an excuse to blame others and not focus on their own intelligence capabilities, or in this case, failures in Mexico

I was unsure what they meant by drug certification so I looked it up and in a different article it says,

“In early 1997 and again in 1998, the Clinton administration set off a firestorm on Capitol Hill with its drug certification decisions, which rate the anti-narcotics efforts of other countries. Members of Congress scurried to release ever longer lists of detailed demands on Mexico, and to see who could champion the largest package of arms and training for the military and police in Colombia. We deserve more than a repeat performance from lawmakers in the years ahead.

Congress should end the drug certification requirement. The policy has been an ineffective tool for drug control, and it has undermined other important U.S. interests in the Western Hemisphere.”

The quote above comes from this website here: http://www.fpif.org/reports/drug_certification

So now that I’m informed on what drug certification is, this makes more sense. It’s just like what’s going on with the ATF and their numerous unorganized operations. The intelligence agencies have a terrible reputation when it comes to the drug war in Mexico.

The piece said, ” General Gutierrez was arrested on Feb. 6 and the Administration only learned of it two weeks later. Where were the Drug Enforcement Administration and the Central Intelligence Agency? A thorough reorganization of the United States’ antidrug effort in Mexico is needed.”

Yep, that definitely sounds like something someone would say these days as well. The times may change but the government and its organizations doesn’t.

The link for that piece is here: http://www.nytimes.com/1997/02/28/opinion/l-mexico-drug-war-exposes-us-intelligence-gap-854565.html

The next piece was a regular opinion article written February 15, 1999, just two years after the previously mentioned article.

This one started out with “Mexican officials recently unveiled a $400 million high-tech anti-narcotics strategy billed as a ”total war” on drug trafficking.”

So it reveals Mexico’s plan saying that this was no surprise. Then it moves on to also criticize drug certification and blame the U.S. for it’s ridiculous need for drugs.

Well doesn’t this all sound familiar? That’s because it is.

Mexico still has its “anti-narcotics strategy” that costs millions of dollars, and the U.S. still has an immense hunger for illegal drugs. Nothing has changed except the drug certification. That’s not used anymore…and if it is in some cases,  it’s not made a big deal.

The link to this article is here: http://www.nytimes.com/1999/02/15/opinion/judging-the-mexican-drug-war.html

So, it’s unbelievable to think from over 10 years ago to now, we are still stuck in the same predicament…except it’s continuously getting worse. More deaths, more money being spent, more need for illegal drugs. Corruption and travesty. Such a sad ordeal.

These articles and many of the opinion pieces today still stand by the fact that Mexico and the U.S. are to be equally blamed for this, just as my mission statement claims.

Stop doing drugs!

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Where does the line end?

 

As I was doing some research on the continuous drug violence in Mexico, I came across these maps that I for some reason didn’t think existed. I didn’t know they existed because I was unaware that people knew the exact territories/cities/provinces that each cartel had taken over. I guess I think it’s kinda crazy that the lines are so well-defined, but apparently they are and they’re certainly out there.

So far Los Zetas seem to be the most dominating drug gang in Mexico and are slowly gaining prominence in southern United States as well.

This one goes even more into depth, showing the drug trafficking directions as in what’s coming from where and where it’s leading to, as well as specifying which drugs are the ones being trafficked. It appears that Cocaine is the most popular substance being shipped, and mostly from South America from countries such as Colombia, Venezuela, and Brazil. Latins indirectly assisting their Latin brothers in the murdering of innocent people… for what? For a small sum of money? For a powdery substance that gives you a temporary feel good moment in time?

I had no idea that China also ships drugs to Mexico, this is new news to me. Fascinating to think they are also contributing to this tragic mess. I should change my mission statement from Mexico and the U.S. are both equally to be blamed, to the revised version of Mexico, the U.S., Latin America, and China are all to be partly blamed for the drug cartel violence occurring in Mexico.

Next I’m going to find out that Canada, or Australia, or Africa is contributing. Like where does the line end really?

When the violence is not happening to you or someone you care about, it doesn’t really matter. All we care about is making our money.

Drug Violence Map of Mexico Political Cartoon

This is a political cartoon I found on Google Images dramatically imitating the various “cartel influence” maps that are on the internet. This image, in my opinion, is emitting the message that the violence is spread out entirely through out Mexico and even splattering over into the United States. There are no specific territories, or fine lines where drug cartel influence reigns, because it is affecting everyone all over Mexico and even those in southern United States. On a side note, the artist of the cartoon highlights the state of Wisconsin because of an incident that occurred in 2010 when “federal officials found hundreds of pounds of pot in the forests of northern Wisconsin that were apparently being tended by Mexican nationals.” (http://host.madison.com/wsj/news/opinion/column/phil_hands/article_aefae97e-ad6e-11df-841f-001cc4c002e0.html) Thus is it not only affecting southern United States, but it’s slowly progressing to northern United States as well. An ugly truth that will only worsen if we don’t pay any attention to the issue.

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“Wide Receiver” created the wide problem

New report on Wednesday October 5th from CBS News finds that operation “Fast and Furious” had been running for over 4 years with a different alias. This operation called, “Operation Wide Receiver,” had been carried out under the Bush administration, under the watchful eye of the ATF whose job is designed to bring gun trafficking to a halt, but instead allowed the “walking” of guns over the Mexican border.

A man by the name of Mike Detty, “gun enthusiast and licensed dealer” was selling guns at a gun show in Tucson Arizona (only an hour away from the Mexican border) in early 2006. One day a Hispanic man entered in the shop and bought 6 rifles in $1600 cash.

The man asked if he had more and he informed him that he would be receiving a shipment of 20 the following month, the young man straight up replied that he would purchase them all.

If you don’t find that suspicious I don’t know what you would. Just as any reasonable man would be, Detty was wary of this guy and reported the encounter to the ATF.  Their quick response was their request that he continue with the sale and they would send an agent to observe. At this point, ATF stepped in completely and inquired that Detty be their confidential informant. They told him that they had “a real chance at taking out a powerful cartel” so of course Detty like any other loyal man, wanted to help, and in an interview he stated “I made that commitment. And I really thought I was doing something good.’”

They even made him sign an “informant contract,” which in it, led him to believe that all he was doing was selling to “suspected traffickers,” and from there the ATF would “track the weapons, expose the cartel’s inner workings, and then interdict the guns before they could ever get loose on the street.” But it appears that this was not so.

After some time, Detty was uncomfortable and displeased with the whole situation, knowing that the ATF was allowing guns to “walk” the border instead of carrying out what they had told him previously. He eventually came forward with the information to the media, and revealed that he must’ve sold about 450 guns. That is absolutely unbelievable to me.  Just stop and think for one moment, and imagine if every individual had one gun, so 450 people carrying one gun…and they killed just one person each…they’ve thus far killed 450 innocent people. But of course we know that they killing more than just a single person with each of these guns! Even if they just killed 10 people with each gun, you already have a total of 4500 people killed! That is heart breaking!

So of course Mike Detty said looking back on it, knowing what he knows now, “It makes me sick.”

At least there’s one sensible person! Did the ATF leaders of the operation really not understand the consequences of what they were doing? Are they really that dumb? Or do they not care in assisting the assassination of thousands of innocent people?

And if that border patrol agent, Brian Terry, did not get murdered, these operations would still be playing out, without anyone outside of the government knowing. As I have been reading different articles about the two gun-walking operations, I like to read the comments that readers put, and I have noticed a lot of people like to put the blame solely on the President. And that’s honestly just a first resort to throw the blame on, because the President can’t do everything on his own, he’s not the only one making decisions around here, there are hundreds of other minds involved in these operations as well. So, it doesn’t matter if it’s under Obama or under Bush, there’s other people working beneath them that their job is specifically to take care of operations like “Fast and Furious” and “Wide Receiver.”

And not only should we blame our government, and the evil cartels in Mexico, and the government in Mexico, but like I have been putting in all my other posts, we have to blame the drug users which not only exist in Mexico but also exist in the United States. So, I’m pretty sure there’s a decent amount of comments from people on these articles blaming Obama for what’s going on when those people are the ones buying drugs, so they’re contributing as well! So go ahead, blame the president, but you should be looking at yourself in the mirror buddy.

So, to finish off what happened to Operation Wide Receiver, “prosecutors finally, quietly, rounded up seven suspects last fall.” Wow, what an accomplishment, great job guys…pshhh

And of course when CBS tried to reach the former Attorney General, Alberto Gonzalez,  who was in office at the time of “Wide Receiver”  they failed, I’m sure he did not want to receive any scrutiny from the media. How come no one is questioning Bush? I guess this is all Obama’s fault even though the first original gun walking project was conducted under Bush, hmmm.

Regardless, the loss of lives continues as the clock is ticking and at this point the United States (along with Mexico of course)  has only contributed to those losses rather than try to stop or prevent them. Nothing new.

Article Source: http://www.cbsnews.com/stories/2011/10/05/earlyshow/main20115824.shtm

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Where did the bullet come from?


A few months ago in March, President Obama gave a speech saying that Mexico and the U.S. are making progress towards the violenct acts of the drug cartels. However, the US ATF agency (Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives) are the ones putting the guns in the cartels’ hands. Is this really a step towards progress?

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