Tag Archives: drug war

a report on Mexico’s constant struggle

“Once known as a booming industrial city and a model of economic progress in Mexico, the border city of Juarez has become infamous as the murder capital of the world.

More than 8,000 people have been killed there since 2008, when Mexican President Felipe Calderon sent in the army to carry out his offensive against the drug cartels.

The official story is that the Sinaloa and Juarez cartels are fighting for the city and the access it provides to the multi-billion dollar US drug market only a few hundred meters away.

On this episode of Fault Lines, Josh Rushing travels to Ciudad Juarez, and asks how human life there came to be worth so much less than the drugs being trafficked through.” -Fault Lines


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Mexican Secretary of Interior Dead

On Friday, November 11, 2011, the Mexican Secretary of the Interior Francisco Mora at the age of 45 was killed in a helicopter crash while on his way to a judicial meeting.

He was President Calderon’s main supporter and advocate in the military fight against the drug cartels, “frequently traveling to violence-torn cities for meetings with besieged state and local security officials.”

He was extremely hardcore on the drug business and would vow publicly to step up the fight towards the traffickers rather than backing out of it or turning it down a notch.

Along with this, many times he passionately announced to increase the presence of military and national police in dangerous areas and continue to reside there until drug cartel members were captured.

After detectives discovered over a hundred bodies in ditches near the United States border, Mora said, “Organized crime, in its desperation, resorts to committing atrocities that we can’t and shouldn’t tolerate as a government and as a society.”

As a result he declared to instigate a “five-point initiative” to delve into the crimes as well as advance security. This included “the federal monitoring of buses such as those used by the migrant victims.”

He was excellent in the areas dealing with natural disasters, oil, forensic studies, politics, and much more. He was a native from Tijuana and initially trained as a lawyer, he began his path towards politics in the mid-1990s as an official in his hometown. He served a few years under Calderon as a Congressmen in his party, then he moved to serve a local legislator in northern state Baja California.

2007 was the year he was named as interior secretary for Baja, rising higher in position to nation wide until he died last Friday. It’s sad that “Calderon lost another interior secretary, Juan Camilo Mourino, in a plane crash in Mexico City in November 2008.”

May these men rest in peace.

 

Article Source: http://www.foxnews.com/world/2011/11/11/face-mexicos-drug-war-dies-in-chopper-crash/

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Leftist presidential Candidate’s stance on drug war

 

Marcelo Ebrard is the Mayor of Mexico City and is running in the 2012 Mexican presidential election. He says that if he were to be elected president he would take out the country’s military from the drug cartel fight and discuss with policymakers from the U.S. on how they can improve laws regarding narcotics in both countries.

He proclaims that the relationship between certain drugs like marijuana consumption and the fabrication and distributing of it are “schizophrenic.”

It isn’t logical according to him that “the United States is legalizing marijuana and we’re over here killing ourselves on the street over marijuana.” He backs up his claim by saying that the legalization of marijuana in California has reduced illegal drug dealing and drug related conflicts and misdemeanors.

He goes on to say, “We need to have a common policy with the United States, because if not, we have a schizophrenic scheme that is very costly for Mexico.”

He reported his stance on this particular issue at an interview at City Hall, where on the same day the government released a book, published by the government, glorifying all of Mayor Ebrard’s successes throughout his term as Mayor in certain areas like environment and transportation.

This book along with his unique stance on popular issues in Mexico will support his effort to make his name known nationally throughout Mexico where most voters don’t know who he is.

The only thing standing in his way is the former Mexico City Mayor Andres Manuel Lopez Obrador. He, unlike Ebrard, is popular and well-known throughout the nation, and is well-favored even when people ragged on him for not respecting Calderon when he took office.

By the end of this week, polls will tell who will become the next leftist candidate that will run in the 2012 Mexican presidential election. It could be Ebrard…it could be Obrador.

Going back to the issue at hand, he declares he would take the military out of the streets and create “state police forces that could tackle trafficking and corruption locally. He’d also seek to reform the judicial system.”

This is something completely different than Calderon’s current and future plans for the security and drug issue. He wants the military to stay “on the job” until the existing local and state police forces have been evaluated and rid of their corrupted officers, traitors and instigators of harm to the innocent Mexican civilians.

Calderon did, however, win “approval of a judicial reform bill in 2008 that, among other things, would bring U.S.-style oral trials to Mexico.” All other reform plans though have been held up by a disobliging Congress.

At this point, in my opinion, I would like to see Mexico get Calderon out of office. See if any positive change could happen from a different person occupying the king’s throne, but I don’t know if Ebrard would be the right guy to do that, since I don’t know any of his other stances on policies/issues.

I’m not completely hating on Calderon either. I will commend him on the economy improving significantly since he’s been in office, but a breath of fresh air from Calderon sounds nice.   

Article Source: http://latimesblogs.latimes.com/world_now/2011/11/mexico-city-mayor-drug-war.html

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