Tag Archives: death

My Final analysis of the Mexican drug war

Well, this is my last posting ever since I’m finishing this school semester. If anyone out there actually read this, I hope you found something useful. I know I definitely learned a lot.

I’ve never been this in tune with a political issue before, and I like being able to know a little bit more about what’s going in the world.

I hope you enjoy this video of me singing a song that I wrote called “No Mas Sangre” in dedication to the No Mas Sangre protest movement and campaign held in Mexico to promote peace and the ending of bloodshed.

SONG WRITTEN BY MICHELLE CUE

LYRICS:

How can this have a beautiful ending

When leaders and cheaters work behind enemy lines

Children of men cower into a life of crime

While we watch from the sidelines

CHORUS: No más sangre, que me duele, cansada de llorar

 Están matando mis hermanos, robando felicidad

Tiempo es de proclamarlo , que cese la sinrazón.

  Ya en mis ojos veo rojo. Cuando va terminar?

My neighbor with their addictions

My neighbor with his ambitions

We’ll never win this war if we’re always divided

So throw in your guns

Don’t give in to submission

Our hands united as one

 Chorus

Bridge: madres sin hijos, hijos sin padres

Ohhh

 Chorus (2x)

_________________________________________________

English Translation of Chorus: No more blood because it hurts me, I’m tired of crying. They’re killing my brothers robbing them of happiness. It’s time to proclaim the ceasing of (killing) without reason. Now in my eyes I see red. When will this end?

English Translation of Bridge: Mothers without kids, and kids without fathers

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The children continue to suffer

An article in Latino Fox News talks about the suffering and victimization of young Mexican students now attending school in Texas.

They have a lot of psychological issues since they have grown up for over 6 years now in a war zone because of the Mexican drug war.

Even though they are mostly free of physical dangers they still have many emotional issues to work through.

One of the classes they take involve a victimization course in which educators teach about the psychological stages of a mind that has suffered from violence.

But these youth understand and have gone through these stages many, many times and don’t need a constant reminder since they are living through it everyday.

One of the 17-year-old students, Alan Garcias, declared to his classroom crying, “I’ve been through all three stages: impact, recoil, reorganization of my life. My mom goes in and out of recoil stage.”

These troubling times for these students have been a problem in their academic studies that it’s led to some Texas school districts having to provide classes and counseling they teach in the military, since those in the military have been through similar experiences.

Officials aren’t keeping track of the students troubled by the violence on the border seeking help or counseling, but it involves kids from border cities that go to the U.S. for schooling as well as those that have already moved to Texas to go to school.

It’s really sad because many families are afraid to reach out and seek help because they think that if they talk to counselors they would be identified by the criminals that are trying to harm them. So parents encourage their kids to not speak about their issues.

“The emotional difficulties affect them ‘in many areas of academic performance,’ said Alma Leal, professor of counseling at the University of Texas at Brownsville and coordinator for counseling and guidance of the Brownsville Independent School District. They suffer from poor discipline, lack any sense of security and fear losing loved ones.”

One of the courses taught as I mentioned earlier that deals with victimization, also explains how children and teens can talk about their experiences. Keeping those thoughts and feelings inside are not healthy for children.

Counselors have been teaching these classes utilizing the same skills they learned to counsel children of military parents.

“Children fleeing from the cross-border violence and those whose parents have been in combat share issues like separation or loss of a parent, she said. But unlike military children, those coming from Mexico have sometimes been exposed to violence or been victims themselves.”

The issue that they are battling is that the entire community doesn’t understand the importance of helping the children. They are simply “tackling the problem, but we are not solving it.” (<<<Alvaros)

Read the article about this issue here: http://latino.foxnews.com/latino/news/2011/11/28/students-survive-mexican-drug-war-but-struggle-with-emotions-in-texas-schools/#ixzz1f7ybHleX

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Cartels threaten voters’ lives

Drug cartels have been trying to change the votes of Mexican citizens by threatening that their houses be burned and their families killed inside them. They did not want the PRD party to be one of the final candidates so they made phone calls to Morelia (a state capital) threatening them with these attacks also saying that if anyone mentions this threat they will all be killed.

Well, it turns out that the PRD candidate was unsuccessful in getting voted, and he proclaims it was the cartels’ fault.

However, there are still other candidates that are standing for the freedom of voting and saying that they will continue to encourage citizens to vote who they please…that is one right they (cartels) cannot take away from the people.

I guess we’ll see how all of that turns out this coming year in the official election in 2012.

I’m not sure if the Mexican inhabitants are totally convinced by the cartels or by the government. In the end people choose what they want to do…which may result in death, which may not. It’s really unfortunate that even for something so small as voting for someone can be a threat to their life.

Meanwhile, the United States is worried about its own election, where the candidates don’t have much to say about this entire issue.

It’s an odd thought for me as an American in present day to have a censorship on voting.

I suppose if this were over 90 years ago, I would have not been able to vote since I’m a woman.

But thankfully I’m not living in that era.

And thankfully my life is not threatened if I want to vote for a specific person or party.

I’m extremely fortunate to have many freedoms. Now if only the drug abusers in the U.S. that also possess many of those freedoms will think about the freedoms (or lack of) of those innocent people in Mexico.

But it doesn’t seem likely.

 

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What did old articles say?

So just for the heck of it, I decided to look up older articles about the Mexican drug war to see if they were saying anything different back then to what people are saying now. But to my surprise, I discovered a lot of the same comments and opinions.

I looked up two different articles. One from 1997 and the other from 1999 and both located in the New York Times online. They are both opinion pieces and very short, but that’s what i wanted. Something that just shared what they thought over 10 years ago about the issue quick and straight to the point.

The first one from February 28, 1997 is a letter to the editor. This person touches upon drug certification and that the government uses that as an excuse to blame others and not focus on their own intelligence capabilities, or in this case, failures in Mexico

I was unsure what they meant by drug certification so I looked it up and in a different article it says,

“In early 1997 and again in 1998, the Clinton administration set off a firestorm on Capitol Hill with its drug certification decisions, which rate the anti-narcotics efforts of other countries. Members of Congress scurried to release ever longer lists of detailed demands on Mexico, and to see who could champion the largest package of arms and training for the military and police in Colombia. We deserve more than a repeat performance from lawmakers in the years ahead.

Congress should end the drug certification requirement. The policy has been an ineffective tool for drug control, and it has undermined other important U.S. interests in the Western Hemisphere.”

The quote above comes from this website here: http://www.fpif.org/reports/drug_certification

So now that I’m informed on what drug certification is, this makes more sense. It’s just like what’s going on with the ATF and their numerous unorganized operations. The intelligence agencies have a terrible reputation when it comes to the drug war in Mexico.

The piece said, ” General Gutierrez was arrested on Feb. 6 and the Administration only learned of it two weeks later. Where were the Drug Enforcement Administration and the Central Intelligence Agency? A thorough reorganization of the United States’ antidrug effort in Mexico is needed.”

Yep, that definitely sounds like something someone would say these days as well. The times may change but the government and its organizations doesn’t.

The link for that piece is here: http://www.nytimes.com/1997/02/28/opinion/l-mexico-drug-war-exposes-us-intelligence-gap-854565.html

The next piece was a regular opinion article written February 15, 1999, just two years after the previously mentioned article.

This one started out with “Mexican officials recently unveiled a $400 million high-tech anti-narcotics strategy billed as a ”total war” on drug trafficking.”

So it reveals Mexico’s plan saying that this was no surprise. Then it moves on to also criticize drug certification and blame the U.S. for it’s ridiculous need for drugs.

Well doesn’t this all sound familiar? That’s because it is.

Mexico still has its “anti-narcotics strategy” that costs millions of dollars, and the U.S. still has an immense hunger for illegal drugs. Nothing has changed except the drug certification. That’s not used anymore…and if it is in some cases,  it’s not made a big deal.

The link to this article is here: http://www.nytimes.com/1999/02/15/opinion/judging-the-mexican-drug-war.html

So, it’s unbelievable to think from over 10 years ago to now, we are still stuck in the same predicament…except it’s continuously getting worse. More deaths, more money being spent, more need for illegal drugs. Corruption and travesty. Such a sad ordeal.

These articles and many of the opinion pieces today still stand by the fact that Mexico and the U.S. are to be equally blamed for this, just as my mission statement claims.

Stop doing drugs!

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Famous Mexican Hitman

El Sicario is a well-known hitman working in Mexico to kill all sorts of people. Criminals, beautiful women, guys that didn’t pay back their loans, and even guys that did pay back their loans. He’s been working for a Mexican drug cartel for years, and in an interview with Michael Bowden he discusses his life as a professional assassin.
“The sicario sits in a chair, in the same motel room where he  used to hold his kidnap victims and torture them. He has a black felt pen and a large sketch pad. As he tells his stories, he makes primitive diagrams or lists to emphasize his points.”
There is no escaping from this hitman. He’s very skilled, strategic, smart and knows a lot of people. And when it’s time to capture and/or kill a victim, “the police will have been told in advance to make themselves scarce.”
It’s so scary to think that nothing can stop these people. Even the police are afraid of them. Are they going to take over the world? Like really what can anyone do to stop them? We’ve seen this repeated several times like in Argentina, Colombia, and other countries and eventually  each one has died down. But now that this specific war is getting extremely close to the United States, it seems like nothing will stop them. Everyone thinks that legalization of drugs will make things better, but I don’t really see that being the case. People want things they can’t really have. The new, more dangerous illegal drug will come around and people will hunger for it and not care as much for marijuana or cocaine. I don’t believe legalization will solve this issue.

The sicario (in spanish meaning hitman), started out working for the Juarez cartel in his highschool years, and since then has only gotten better at what he does.  After highschool he decided to enter the police academy although he was only eligible in one of the 5 areas he was required to know.

“The academy taught him many skills – surveillance, interrogation, how to use weapons, etc., that made him a better and deadlier criminal.
By the time he graduated, 50 members of his class of 200 were already on the payroll of the narcos. He says that the narcos are present in every institution and at every level of society.”

It is just unbelievable that they just let this guy in like it’s no big deal. You can see what a corrupt organization they’re running. Reading from the actual interview itself, the hitman said the MAYOR of Juarez was the one that got him into the police academy!
I just can’t comprehend what’s going through the minds of people…not just the police academies, or government, but everyone in general. Why did this even start?
Most people would blame it on the U.S. It started for their craving for illegal drugs, however, it doesn’t mean that Mexicans (narcos) had to turn into criminals and start serving the needs of the U.S. citizens. I just hate when people don’t do the right thing. We’re all born with a right and wrong sense…how can they live the lifestyle they know is wrong? It drives me crazy…where is the good in people?
There must be other ways to make money than this dangerous and violent lifestyle.
The assassin said it was an “easy” way to live. Had nothing to do with his childhood or the way he was raised. How can killing people be an easy way to live?
I don’t care if the cartels are swimming in large piles of money, I would hope your morality as an individual and a clean conscience should count for something, but apparently I’m wrong. Living in filth is the cool thing to do.
How much happiness can the cartel’s money really buy? The sensation of power can only go so far when you realize no one truly loves or cares about you. I could rant for hours on end about this…I’m an extremely moral person, if that makes sense.
If any family member tells the police of loved ones kidnapping when they are threatened not too, the cartels immediately find out and will kill anyone in that family and anyone that gets in their way.
The original article that I found this interview on is from an online Canadian newspaper. The individual that wrote this had a lot of compassion towards the  people of Mexico and seemed angered towards the Canadian Immigration and Refugee Board and the Minister of the board.  She wishes she could make the Minster and others on the board watch the documentary about this Sicario interview to stir up some kind of compassion about the Mexicans that had been seeking refuge in Canada.
She believes that if Mexicans say they are afraid for their safety and their lives that people should not doubt them right away.

“A CP story on the CBC website says that in 2005, 3,400 Mexicans made refugee claims in Canada. In 2009 there were 9,400 claims (remarkably close to the number of people killed that year, which was 9,600, according to a Mexican government report quoted by Democracy Now.)
But it seems that Canadian government officials didn’t look for an explanation for this increase (here’s a potential one: Mexican president Calderon brought the army into the “war on drugs” in January 2008. ).”

But apparently now the Canadian government chose that Mexicans require a visa to visit Canada because they believe that “Mexican requests are not serious.”

“The same CP story on the CBC website goes on to say: “Asylum claims from Mexico decreased 90 per cent in 2010 compared to 2009,” Ana Curic said in an email to The Canadian Press. “That has saved taxpayers $400 million.”
Of course, it’s nice to save money, but did we do it at the cost of someone’s life?”

It’s a bummer that now Canada has decided to get harsh on immigration like the U.S. has started to. It seems like no one is able to help the innocent Mexican people. I hate that I feel helpless, I can’t do anything except sit here and blog about it.

I have not seen the documentary about El Sicario, Room 164, but I definitely plan on it.

Maybe some miracle will happen and the innocent people will be saved, but for now, they’re in desperate need of help.

Article Source: http://blogs.montrealgazette.com/2011/11/19/ridm-2011-a-very-dark-side-of-mexico-el-sicario-room-164/

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drug Cartels+MX gov+American Gov=destruction

Many people argue that the head on fight against the drug cartels in Mexico is counter-productive, while the government apparently favors this method. However, a few days ago a new study was released by the Cato Institute by Dr. Ted Galen Carpenter in which he examines the ventures of the Mexican drug war and covers their failures and further research.

The title of the study is called Undermining Mexico’s Drug Cartels. This study puts it’s attention towards the consequences of the prohibition of drugs along with the argument of legalization. In addition to this, it goes over the dangers and violence blowing up just south of the U.S. border, slowly sneaking it’s way into the United States.

Often outsiders believe that the drug cartels are the only ones accountable for the violence and mass murders covering Mexico, but what’s forgotten or perhaps ignored is the indirect faults of both the Mexican and American governments.

Top international drug-war expert Sanho Tree says that cartels are not in favor of killing people because it messes up business. The case in which this happens is when they really want to occupy a certain area of land, or a city, to be in control of and have their business there, but there’s competition/another gang in the way.

The government have their hands full getting rid of the cartel competition, but those ones that are being “rid of,” as in getting arrested, or the ones that aren’t very smart in their tactics and don’t really know what they’re doing. It’s the other ones, the ones that use strategy and are creative and know what they’re doing are the ones that succeed.

When looking at it from a large perspective, Tree says this is what we can behold of Mexico these days, “state-directed efforts are selectively creating coteries of super-traffickers.”

Therefore, the whole message they are trying to get across is that using war to get rid of a drug problem is not the answer, it is ultimately catastrophic.

I did not hear about this, but apparently “the government boosts drug prices by artificially constricting supply while demand remains constant.”

But putting the cost of drugs aside, the cost of human life has been greater. This is something that cannot be ignored. The blame is on the shoulder of the drug cartels, the Mexican government, and the United States government. They all share an equal part in the violence, and they are all able to do their fair share to change their ways and their policies; to succeed not fail!

Article Source: http://nationalinterest.org/blog/the-skeptics/re-framing-drug-violence-6159

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a report on Mexico’s constant struggle

“Once known as a booming industrial city and a model of economic progress in Mexico, the border city of Juarez has become infamous as the murder capital of the world.

More than 8,000 people have been killed there since 2008, when Mexican President Felipe Calderon sent in the army to carry out his offensive against the drug cartels.

The official story is that the Sinaloa and Juarez cartels are fighting for the city and the access it provides to the multi-billion dollar US drug market only a few hundred meters away.

On this episode of Fault Lines, Josh Rushing travels to Ciudad Juarez, and asks how human life there came to be worth so much less than the drugs being trafficked through.” -Fault Lines


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