Tag Archives: abuse

Cartels threaten voters’ lives

Drug cartels have been trying to change the votes of Mexican citizens by threatening that their houses be burned and their families killed inside them. They did not want the PRD party to be one of the final candidates so they made phone calls to Morelia (a state capital) threatening them with these attacks also saying that if anyone mentions this threat they will all be killed.

Well, it turns out that the PRD candidate was unsuccessful in getting voted, and he proclaims it was the cartels’ fault.

However, there are still other candidates that are standing for the freedom of voting and saying that they will continue to encourage citizens to vote who they please…that is one right they (cartels) cannot take away from the people.

I guess we’ll see how all of that turns out this coming year in the official election in 2012.

I’m not sure if the Mexican inhabitants are totally convinced by the cartels or by the government. In the end people choose what they want to do…which may result in death, which may not. It’s really unfortunate that even for something so small as voting for someone can be a threat to their life.

Meanwhile, the United States is worried about its own election, where the candidates don’t have much to say about this entire issue.

It’s an odd thought for me as an American in present day to have a censorship on voting.

I suppose if this were over 90 years ago, I would have not been able to vote since I’m a woman.

But thankfully I’m not living in that era.

And thankfully my life is not threatened if I want to vote for a specific person or party.

I’m extremely fortunate to have many freedoms. Now if only the drug abusers in the U.S. that also possess many of those freedoms will think about the freedoms (or lack of) of those innocent people in Mexico.

But it doesn’t seem likely.

 

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human rights watch cites dozens of authority abuse issues in mexico

A group called the Human Rights Watch went to Mexico where the drug cartel violence had been extremely gruesome and talked to many families in which a loved one in their family became of a captured victim of the Mexican navy, army, or other authority figured force.

Some of these victims were kidnapped and never appeared again, others were shot and killed.

These families call the government, and agencies, and human rights commissions, and no one is willing to help. Even some go to the courts to share their experience of torture and abuse and the judge doesn’t believe them. There’s authority abuse on all sides of the spectrum, ” from prosecutors who give detainees prewritten confessions to sign, to medical examiners who classify beatings and electric shock as causing minor injuries.”

An article in the Huffington Post states, “Only 15 soldiers have been convicted out of the 3,671 investigations launched by military prosecutors into alleged human rights violations by soldiers against civilians from 2007 to June 2011, according to the report.”

The only thing these families can do is investigate for themselves, in which they write down and collect  information about the event and write down their accounts of the last time they saw their loved ones and hope someone will listen…someone will help.

Even President Calderon said he’s tired of hearing all the fuss and bother about the Mexican military abuse reports and would rather just let them do their job and not deal with the situation.

I thought a president was supposed to care about the public and their issues, I thought a president is elected to confront situations and deal with them in any way possible until they can get resolved or at least partially taken care of in some form to make the people happy again.

Ever since I’ve started this blog, all the research and reading I’ve done on President Calderon is not positive. It seems he is a selfish guy that only cares about popularity and the Mexican people do not favor him in the slightest.

The Mexican 2012 election is rolling around soon and hopefully he will not get re-elected. Let’s get him out of there and see if the other party, or even just a different candidate could take better action on this manner. Let’s hope they can clean this up.

And perhaps with a different president, they would like to accept the United State’s help more. Maybe things could really change…and for the better with just a new person in that chief position.

Nonetheless, while the time to election is ticking, the Mexican death toll is rising.

To read a lot more on the subject go here: http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2011/11/09/mexico-drug-war-human-rights-abuses_n_1084870.html

 

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What’s your perception?

Since the beginning of the “War on Drugs” and until it ends, if it will ever end, many will ask the question: are U.S. drug users the ones to blame for the fueling of Mexico’s violence? In a report commentated by Peter O’Dowd of Marketplace Public Radio, on June 15, 2011, he shares the accounts of different individuals from very unique backgrounds from a drug screening facility in Phoenix, Arizona, on their views of U.S. drug users in direct relation to the violence in Mexico.

A statistic indicated in the expose stated that according to a study done by the World Health Origination, out of 17 countries surveyed, the United States use drugs such as marijuana and cocaine more often than any other country in the study.

From this assessment, we hear from O’Dowd’s first encounter, Barbara Zugor, the director of the drug screening center. She believes that “there will probably be drugs and drug abuse in this country” for all time if we can’t figure out why is it that Americans have the need to abuse drugs. Her perspective seems just as they affirm in the report, “philosophical,” more worried on the why (is this an issue), the how (can we better the issue), and the what (will happen if this issue never resolves itself).

His second interviewee, is not named because he is a drug dealer. From this guy’s account, we recognize that drug dealers are foolish yes, but brainless, not at all, for a couple reasons. They know there is a lot of demand for their product so they make quick cash, however they also the dangers and the repercussions of what they’re doing plain and simple. This drug dealer himself said, “I think that Mexicans are getting a bad rap. And while a lot of the stuff is coming across the border, it’s our demand that’s pushing it here. It’s like stop the demand, you’ll stop the flow.” His perception is very cut and dry; he’s not worried about the philosophy of it all.

His last interview is with a Phoenix drug user, remaining nameless as well. Her case is a special one since she began smoking pot after she was diagnosed with cancer and the Arizona medical marijuana law had changed. She now purchases it illegally since she does not have the proper/legal authorization to smoke it. When providing her thoughts on the matter she said, “One of the guilt parts that I have over using the marijuana is what’s going on in Mexico. I don’t want to feel that what I’m having to do for my health is hurting somebody else.” Her perception is that of guilt, as a contributing contender to the whole mess that’s going on, she feels she is a small piece of the problem; which in reality, she absolutely is.

The last line of the report that still blows my mind no matter how many times or how many different way I may hear it, says, “All those little drug sales, all over America, add up to as much as $39 billion each year that heads south across the border.” That is remarkable.

So from these three different stances on the subject, one has to think which side of the perception spectrum are they on. Do you want to think more philosophically about the topic and see how you can help better the problem? Do you want to be the guy that knows the facts cut and dry but still not care about the situation? Or do you want to have that guilty conscience, knowing what you’re doing is negatively affecting the nation in which you live, along with those nations of other innocent people?

Article: http://marketplace.publicradio.org/display/web/2011/06/15/pm-are-us-drug-users-to-blame-for-mexican-border-violence/

Audio of article: http://marketplace.publicradio.org/www_publicradio/tools/media_player/popup.php?name=marketplace/pm/2011/06/15/marketplace_cast1_20110615_64&starttime=00:22:09.0&endtime=00:26:33.0

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