Tag Archives: 2012

mexican cease-fire on christmas

Javier Sicilia is a Mexican poet that I’ve posted about before. He’s the guy that instigated an activist movement to work towards obtaining and spreading the message of peace (the Movement of Peace with Justice and Dignity) in Mexico ever since the Pacifico Sur cartel shooting and murdering of his son back in March.

Sicilia attended an international book fair this past weekend in Guadalajara and asked that the cartels and the Mexican government pause and have “a cease-fire” moment on Christmas Eve and Christmas Day, the 24th and 25th. He requests that these two entities have this break not only for the sake of Christmas and the meaning behind it, but also so they may “reflect on what they are doing, what they are doing to the country.”

He went on to say, “I ask for this truce as a momentary pause, not just in honor of Christmas, but to think about the harm we’re doing to ourselves and what those guilty of murder and corruption are doing to themselves, and the damage done by authorities who do not fulfill their obligations,” Sicilia said.   In the event, he called for all the people there take a minute of silence to commemorate all of those whom have died in the drug war and those who continue to die. Right after that is when he asked for the days of cease-fire.

Sicilia and the many other authors and writers that were with him were crying out about the irresponsibility of the government.   Writer Alejandro Rosas said something that Mexico must be very worried about is “a very incipient, very weak democracy,” and targeted the issue of the 2012 presidential elections in Mexico.   Rosas believes that the end of the world would come if the PRI (Institutional Revolutionary Party) came back into power. This comment brought a large applause from the audience.   Along with the applause coming from this political attack, came the cheers from the attacks and criticisms targeted at President Calderon who initiated the entire all out war against the cartels and who as a result, in many people’s opinions, advanced/widened the violence in Mexico.

Writer Paco Ignacio Taibo II demanded that those at fault for the situation and contributing to Mexico’s “falling to pieces” should be identified.   He also requested that the population attempt to unify “the national discontent into a movement that will remove from power those who now hold it.”

I like that this event happened because it’s inspiring. It’s a group of authors and writers proclaiming peace and declaring something be done and have some ideas about what could be done. It’s not a group of politicians making things up or saying what the people want to hear and then do nothing about it, or add to the violence. What these writers want to do is take away from the violence and promote peace. They are fully aware that an all-out war is not going to contribute to the peace they are trying to spread. There are good people out there trying to do good things, if only people would listen. I’m curious to see if Sicilia’s request will be fulfilled…if the violence will stop for those two Christmas days. At this point all one can do about the situation is continue to spread peace, and hope that things will somehow get better. As well as Mexicans taking a good look at the politicians’ issues and figuring out who may have the best plan to end this headstrong battle.

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Cartels threaten voters’ lives

Drug cartels have been trying to change the votes of Mexican citizens by threatening that their houses be burned and their families killed inside them. They did not want the PRD party to be one of the final candidates so they made phone calls to Morelia (a state capital) threatening them with these attacks also saying that if anyone mentions this threat they will all be killed.

Well, it turns out that the PRD candidate was unsuccessful in getting voted, and he proclaims it was the cartels’ fault.

However, there are still other candidates that are standing for the freedom of voting and saying that they will continue to encourage citizens to vote who they please…that is one right they (cartels) cannot take away from the people.

I guess we’ll see how all of that turns out this coming year in the official election in 2012.

I’m not sure if the Mexican inhabitants are totally convinced by the cartels or by the government. In the end people choose what they want to do…which may result in death, which may not. It’s really unfortunate that even for something so small as voting for someone can be a threat to their life.

Meanwhile, the United States is worried about its own election, where the candidates don’t have much to say about this entire issue.

It’s an odd thought for me as an American in present day to have a censorship on voting.

I suppose if this were over 90 years ago, I would have not been able to vote since I’m a woman.

But thankfully I’m not living in that era.

And thankfully my life is not threatened if I want to vote for a specific person or party.

I’m extremely fortunate to have many freedoms. Now if only the drug abusers in the U.S. that also possess many of those freedoms will think about the freedoms (or lack of) of those innocent people in Mexico.

But it doesn’t seem likely.

 

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Leftist presidential Candidate’s stance on drug war

 

Marcelo Ebrard is the Mayor of Mexico City and is running in the 2012 Mexican presidential election. He says that if he were to be elected president he would take out the country’s military from the drug cartel fight and discuss with policymakers from the U.S. on how they can improve laws regarding narcotics in both countries.

He proclaims that the relationship between certain drugs like marijuana consumption and the fabrication and distributing of it are “schizophrenic.”

It isn’t logical according to him that “the United States is legalizing marijuana and we’re over here killing ourselves on the street over marijuana.” He backs up his claim by saying that the legalization of marijuana in California has reduced illegal drug dealing and drug related conflicts and misdemeanors.

He goes on to say, “We need to have a common policy with the United States, because if not, we have a schizophrenic scheme that is very costly for Mexico.”

He reported his stance on this particular issue at an interview at City Hall, where on the same day the government released a book, published by the government, glorifying all of Mayor Ebrard’s successes throughout his term as Mayor in certain areas like environment and transportation.

This book along with his unique stance on popular issues in Mexico will support his effort to make his name known nationally throughout Mexico where most voters don’t know who he is.

The only thing standing in his way is the former Mexico City Mayor Andres Manuel Lopez Obrador. He, unlike Ebrard, is popular and well-known throughout the nation, and is well-favored even when people ragged on him for not respecting Calderon when he took office.

By the end of this week, polls will tell who will become the next leftist candidate that will run in the 2012 Mexican presidential election. It could be Ebrard…it could be Obrador.

Going back to the issue at hand, he declares he would take the military out of the streets and create “state police forces that could tackle trafficking and corruption locally. He’d also seek to reform the judicial system.”

This is something completely different than Calderon’s current and future plans for the security and drug issue. He wants the military to stay “on the job” until the existing local and state police forces have been evaluated and rid of their corrupted officers, traitors and instigators of harm to the innocent Mexican civilians.

Calderon did, however, win “approval of a judicial reform bill in 2008 that, among other things, would bring U.S.-style oral trials to Mexico.” All other reform plans though have been held up by a disobliging Congress.

At this point, in my opinion, I would like to see Mexico get Calderon out of office. See if any positive change could happen from a different person occupying the king’s throne, but I don’t know if Ebrard would be the right guy to do that, since I don’t know any of his other stances on policies/issues.

I’m not completely hating on Calderon either. I will commend him on the economy improving significantly since he’s been in office, but a breath of fresh air from Calderon sounds nice.   

Article Source: http://latimesblogs.latimes.com/world_now/2011/11/mexico-city-mayor-drug-war.html

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